The Tool Book: A Tool Lover’s Guide to Over 200 Hand ToolsConstruction Tools News]

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3 Responses to The Tool Book: A Tool Lover’s Guide to Over 200 Hand ToolsConstruction Tools News]

  • Michael J. Edelman says:
    11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    A picture book of tools, April 17, 2018
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    (VINE VOICE)
      

    Michael J. Edelman (Huntington Woods, MI USA) –

    This review is from: The Tool Book: A Tool Lover’s Guide to Over 200 Hand Tools (Hardcover)
    Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What’s this?)
    Actor-woodworker Nick Offerman has become a sort of Tim the Toolman Taylor for the hand tool world, promoting traditional work and craft, and that’s a good thing. There’s a real resurgence of craft today, and of the skilled trades, and that needs support and encouragement. As a cheerleader for craft, Offerman is great. As a teacher of actual craft, however, he would not be my first choice. His previous book on woodworking was long on examples but short on how-to; a novice looking to build the projects in that book would find themselves with a lot of questions about the basics, like which saw do you use for a particular cut, or how do you plane a true surface .(Anyone looking to learn basic hand woodworking skills should run out and buy a copy of The Essential Woodworker, by Robert Wearing, Lost Art Press.)

    This book is not actually by Offerman; he just wrote the forward, even though his name is displayed in even larger type than that of the actual author. That’s really underhanded marketing, I think. This book purports to be a guide to choosing and using tools, but it’s really more of a picture book with nice illustrations and not very much useful text. For example, the section on handsaws makes no distinction between crosscut saws and ripsaws, nor is saw pitch mentioned. That’s a critical omission. Try to cut a board to length with a six point ripsaw and you’ll end up with a mess. Try to rip with a twelve point crosscut saw and you’ll wonder why your saw keeps jamming. The guide to using an axe is similarly useless. At the same time, there’s no shortage of useless information, like how to distinguish a fascism knife from a billhook, or a parang from a machete.

    What we’re left with is a typical DK coffee table book, something to thumb through for diversion. Perhaps it would make a nice gift for someone with no knowledge of hand tools whatsoever, or something to inspire youngsters to learn more about tools and craft.

  • Anonymous says:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    DK -Always A Great Choice, April 29, 2018
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    (VINE VOICE)
      

    V. Canfield (San Antonio) –

    This review is from: The Tool Book: A Tool Lover’s Guide to Over 200 Hand Tools (Hardcover)
    Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What’s this?)
    If you’re familiar with Eyewitness Books by DK (which I love), this is Eyewitness for grown ups. The images are the typical DK images, with easy to identify labels and short bites of information. There are categories for each type of tool. This includes measuring and marking, cutting and chopping, fixing and fastening, striking and breaking, digging and groundwork, shaping and sharpening, and for finishing and decorating. There is some cool history about each category. The information is in the short bites that is very good for short attention span Millennials. I really like that the images are often like diagrams with lines pointing to different parts, along with a brief description. There are also closeups along side the diagrams for more detail. There are simple instructions for many of the tools given in steps. But most of the tools have a small explanation that follows this pattern:
    What it is
    Use if for
    How to use
    Look for.

    Overall this is a good book for a tool enthusiast, or someone like me, who has recently discovered that there is a tool for everything, but you don’t always know what that tool is. We are presently at the end of construction of our dream house and since we are doing a lot of the work, this book has come in handy on deciding what tool I need to look into buying for particular situations (such as trim work).

  • Anonymous says:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Enjoy this book for what it is, a visual celebration of tools, May 25, 2018
    By 
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    Michael A. Duvernois (Madison, WI) –

    This review is from: The Tool Book: A Tool Lover’s Guide to Over 200 Hand Tools (Hardcover)
    Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What’s this?)
    This isn’t really for the serious tool person, but for the next step down. In the same way that Consumer Reports is amazing for cars, if you’re not a car fanatic, and for home audio, unless you’re an audiophile, and for toasters, unless, well, you care very deeply indeed for toasters. This book is like that. The introduction is by actor and handyman/woodworker Nick Offerman, and if you start into his books you can find a whole world of very serious tool use. This book is more of a coffee table book of tool appreciation.

    It could be a gateway as well to handywoman or handyman ways. I had left this out during our last party, and a couple of our research group’s students were thumbing through it with a considerable amount of energy. They’re smart folks but probably max out at screwdrivers and hammers. So far.

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